Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Inexplicably interesting words II


Like my first post with the same name, I am not claiming this post to be very significant or even worth reading, so feel free to stop reading and "click on" somewhere else. You'll never get back the 15-25 seconds it takes you to read and think about this.

There are several English words that I find intriguing . I always enjoy seeing how, when, and why they are used. Here are a few of those:

Exacerbate: to make more violent, bitter, or severe. To embitter the feelings of (a person); irritate; exasperate. Intensify, inflame, worsen.

Stymie: To thwart; stump. An obstacle or obstruction. A situation in golf in which an opponent's ball obstructs the line of play of one's own ball on the putting green.

Mogul: A powerful business leader or a bump on a ski slope.

Legalese: The specialized vocabulary of the legal profession, especially when considered to be complex or abstruse. The jargon of attorneys, which often seems redundant or unclear to the layperson.

5 comments:

Sean Brandt said...

Fortunately, I had 15-25 seconds to spare.

tom kessler said...

I was glad I didn't have to reading anything controversial while my food was digesting in those 15 seconds.

Frontier Forest said...

I think my word for the day is “duplicity”. Especially during these convoluted and terribly complicated election debates. Duplicity means, deceitfulness in speech or conduct; speaking or acting in two different ways concerning the same matter with intent to deceive; double-dealing. Or duplicity, a twofold or double state or quality. What it seems to boil down to…. Duplicity and politicians, one in the same!

Mark Davis said...

Here are some that, like a car in a ditch, I usually slow down to check out:

Filigree - sounds like a brand of Scotch, doesn't it?

Ombudsman - if elected to such a post, my first act would be to change the name of it.

Tete-a-tete - less than radar love, more than a conversation; an unmanly version of face-to-face; easily misunderstood, sometimes with unpleasant consequences

malcolm said...

Ahh, my all time favorite word is "bodacious" and was also the name of a famous rodeo bull.
adj.
1. Remarkable; prodigious.
2. Audacious; gutsy.
adv.
1. Completely; extremely.
2. Audaciously; boldly.

The best usage of this word was in the movie "An Officer and Gentleman".