Wednesday, April 2, 2008

Inexplicably interesting words III


Here's another installment of "inexplicably interesting words."

I am not claiming this post to be very significant or even worth reading, so feel free to stop reading and "click on" somewhere else. You'll never get back the 15-25 seconds it takes you to read and think about this.

There are several English words that I find intriguing . I always enjoy seeing how, when, and why they are used. Here are a few of those:


Vexation-The act of annoying, irritating, or vexing. Anger produced by some annoying irritation. The act of harassing. The cause of trouble or disquiet; affliction.

Scathing- Bitterly severe. Bitterly denunciatory; harshly critical. Harmful or painful; injurious. Searing.

Palpitations-a rapid pulsation; especially : an abnormally rapid beating of the heart when excited by violent exertion, strong emotion, or disease. Abnormal awareness of the beating of the heart, whether it is too slow, too fast, irregular, or at its normal frequency. The difference between an abnormal awareness and a normal awareness is that the latter is almost always caused by a concentration on the beating of one's heart and the former interrupts other thoughts.

Baptisement- This is a word my 7-year old son Nico made up a couple months ago. After watching one of our church's covenant children be baptized, Nico said- "Dad, the baby didn't cry during the baptisement".

4 comments:

Lyle Burton said...

Kids can be the best source of new words. My granddaughter Alley once told me about a discushment she had with someone about something.

Anonymous said...

Google baptisement and see what you find, its interesting.
NJM

Frontier Forest said...

Every time I type the great Exhortation from Hebrews, 12:2, the spell check tells me that “perfecter” is not a word! Obviously the computer folks who work this dictionary out are not “fixing their eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of faith”.

Jim said...

I can't do without the word "entemplement." God entemples us at baptism (or at the baptisement, as the case may be).