Saturday, February 13, 2010

2010 Olympic thought from Reepicheep


I have only one thought going in to this 21st Winter Olympics- a major international multi-sport event being held through to February 28 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Are you ready?


No "sport" that fails to provide an outcome in terms of goals, time, or distance should be in the Olympics. Period.

Alrighty then, now that I got that off my chest- Let the Games begin!!!


I'm just sayin'

6 comments:

E.M. Simmons said...

Well, maybe the Olympic #1s can score a pound or two of bacon and a pair of Sorrells. So, what "sports" were you referring to? By, the way, did you see any video of that luger who died? I inadvertently did. It was so fast a clip that at first I wasn't sure what was going on. I didn't really see the guy hit the pole, it was so fast. But, right afterward, I figured he was dead. Poor guy.

Woody Woodward said...

So, I guess what you are inferring, figure skating should just be considered, exercise on ice?

Reepicheep said...

Figure Skating is a kind of competition that requires great skill and athleticism- but absent a way to determine an objective winner, it shouldn't be in the Olympics. That's what I'm saying.

Zach said...

I share your discomfort with the subjectivity of scoring in events like figure skating, but where would you have these sports go? What makes the Olympics a particularly inappropriate venue for such sports? It would be a shame to deprive the Winter Olympics of its most popular events. Two points:

First, all sports contain some element of human judgement and are thus a mix of subjectivity and objectivity. Give the skaters helmets and hockey sticks, and the outcome is still determined -- at least somewhat -- by the judgement calls of the referees. Think of how much subjectivity there is in each and every pitch of baseball. You can't score even a single "objective" run without the benefit of multiple, purely subjective, judgement calls from the umpires.

Second, the sport of figure skating has gone to great lengths to constrain the subjectivity in its judging. Requiring a host of specific technical elements in each routine -- and employing technical experts to judge the execution of those elements according to strict and exacting rules -- has gone a long way to keep competitions from devolving into the "popularity contests" that they formerly seemed to be.

Malcolm said...

Subjectivity comes into all sports that have judges, officials, referees or umpires. While skating, diving, gymnastics and others are purely subjective other Olympic sports have been the subject of huge controversies. The most glaring example was the 1972 basketball team coached by Oklahoma State's Henry Iba. The USA team was robbed of the victory because of a subjective call made by the refs.

Reepicheep said...

Zach- Figure Skating has various competitions, let their federation make more. The Olympics should be a place for as much objectivity as possible.

Malcolm- Obviously human endeavors will have some subjectivity, but a result determined on the basis of a vote should not be part of an international competition like the Olympics. There will be bad calls that mess up games, but that's something that can be shown- like the 1972 basketball debacle and all 4 of Buffalo's Superbowl losses (and the Sabres getting robbed in the Stanley Cup finals...a few times). Such are the exceptions and not the norms. As for figure skating, gymnastics, and other such "sports", controversy is the rule, subjectivity dominates, and illegitimacy must be confessed. Not to mention how girly so much of it is...